Archive for Americas

Do you remember your first time?

Friday, May 9th, 2014

My name is Tanner McIver, I am 13 years old and I have been pit crew for Dye sponsored team Hard2Overcome for 3 years who my dad is team owner & captain based in Victoria Australia. Devon Stutz from Dye Asia even arranged for me to have my own Ultralite team playing gear with my name and favourite number. I love paintball and go with the team to every training and tournament, but because of the laws in Victoria I am unable to play paintball until the age of 18.

For over a year I have wanted to go to South Australia where the age to play paintball is only 10. So this year my parents agreed that they would take me over there to play for the first time for my birthday.

So at 4.30am Friday 4th April, Dad, Mum, my younger brother Kayden and I hit the road for our 800km trip to Adelaide where I would get to play paintball. To make the 10 hour trip go faster I slept as much as I could and watched DVD’s and what seemed like forever by 2.30pm we had arrived at the motel. After a short rest dad asked me to get my gear ready for the morning as we were going to go out for dinner in Adelaide and wouldn’t be back until late. As soon as we got back to the room that night I went straight to bed knowing the sooner I went to sleep the sooner I would wake up and play paintball.

We woke at 7am and headed off to the field which was only 10 minutes away. I was excited and helped dad set up the markers which until today I have not been able to touch. Dad set up his DM13 that he used all last year for me, and once the other people arrived we went onto the field and I got to shoot my first paintball over the chrono.

I hopped in with the players doing drills and practiced crawling in the snake and popping up to aim across the field. Then my dad took me aside and had me practice laning off the break at a small target he had set up down the other end of the field. After a while he then got me to run and gun at the target as if I was going out to a corner bunker. Dad made me do it on both my left and right hand so I would be used to shooting with both hands later in the day, and it was really fun shooting loads of paint but I couldn’t wait to shoot at other people.

After a short break and a drink I was asked by the players training to shoot a lane from the centre back bunker to the snake entry and they would try and make it into the snake. It was so cool shooting everyone as they tried to get into the snake and I used a lot of paint which was great.
I also got to shoot dads DM14 a bit which is a sweet looking marker and everyone else kept asking to have a go of it while dad was gun teching for people.

After a short break and reloading my pods and tank we were ready to play some 3v3 games. I was so pumped and dad asked did I want to play with him or against him, so I said I wanted to play against him as I wanted to shoot at him.  Off the break I ran to the snake and crawled along and popped up and started shooting at who ever I could see. My heart was racing as I got my first ever “G” and to watch the ball hit the player and break was great, then suddenly I got shot in the goggles. We played a couple of more games and I got to shoot people before being shot.

Next game was even more fun as I popped up to see my dad shooting at the guy in the back bunker and I shot him in the middle of his goggles.  My dad started laughing and walked off and then I realised there was only one player left in so I got up and ran down the snake and bunkered him, which is something I have seen my team do so many times and it was such a buzz, but the biggest buzz was shooting dad in the face.

We went back to the pits and reloaded and this time I went onto Dad’s side. I played snake again and had a ball bounce off me which hurt more than the ones that broke but still was not that bad. In fact as the day went on and the more games I played the less the paintballs hurt as I was having too much fun. It was cool standing alongside Dad and playing paintball with him. In the end I had the best day ever playing a great sport I can’t wait to play again and again.

When we got back to the motel to meet up with mum and my younger brother I went and had a shower and couldn’t wait to check out all of the hits on me. Mum just smiled and shook her head as I proudly pointed them out and told her about each one. Both Dad and Mum said I couldn’t stop talking all night about the day. That night I slept so well and we left early once again to return home, but this time I slept lots more on the way back.

I want to thank my parents for taking me to South Australia to play paintball, and thank everyone that was at the field who allowed me to shoot them and it’s a day I will never forget. A big thanks to everyone on Hard2Overcome for all the text messages and support. And thank you to Devon Stutz and Dye for helping the team get me this cool Ultralite gear, it’s so comfy.

Dye DAM dominates ‘Soldiers of Fortune’

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

WOLF and AZTEK stopped by Soldiers Of Fortune last weekend for “Day Of Redemption” (a Fundraising event where proceeds go to Sick Kids Hospital & Brain Tumor Research).  One of the local players (member of the Corpse Paintball Team) had life saving brain surgery at Sick Kids Hospital, twice, 4 years ago. Today he is a normal, happy and avid paintball player.  The event had a great turn out and raised $1700 at the field and $6500 online.  Several players and paintball companies such as Dye Paintball donated to this event.  The Dye DAM dominated the field across its smalls towns and wooded area and led General Scarpz and the blue team to a victory. But at the end of the day, the event was a perfect example of camaraderie amongst both teams.

 

Dye Precision 20 Year Anniversary DM14

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

 IRONMEN XX DM14

 BLUE POLISH XX DM14

GRAPHITE PGA XX DM14

Born in 1994 with one product and an athlete’s vision, DYE Precision, founded by Dave Youngblood, has grown and evolved over the past 20 years into an industry leading company with production, design, development, manufacturing and distribution facilities in 8 countries, on 3 continents.

Though in the beginning it was one man and a mission, DYE quickly evolved into an industry leader because it created products, developed by professionals, that people wanted to use. The best teams in paintball were soon wearing and shooting DYE products because they wanted to win, and they needed the best to make their paintball dreams a reality. The championships came and the product line expanded, but the principles behind the product have, and always will, remain the same.

Through trial and error, and tremendous amounts of work behind the scenes, DYE enlisted mechanical and materials engineers, with guidance from graphic designers, and massive input from casual players to the hardest of the hardcore professionals, to polish our designs over the years, creating the product line we now stand behind. Our global headquarters in San Diego connects all these different creative assets with cutting edge technologies creating a refined style, resulting in superior product for players of all levels.

Excellence is in our DNA, we strove at every turn during our 20-year history to inject Dye’s products with a style and functionality that makes our products game changers; we want them to be both workhorses and works of art. From the very beginning, the idea behind DYE was to make extraordinary products through extraordinary effort, in order to create usable tools that transcend appearances, because ultimately it’s about what works in the real world. Our products are created to magnify the on-field experience, to make pure and potent paintball experiences possible.

Dye has brought its creative might to bear to solve many problems facing players during its evolution so our customers can have the best experience possible out on the field. We’re proud our full line of products has been used by every type of paintball player all over the world, from first day recreational walk-ons, tactical fanatics, to dominant World Champions.

Today, the Matrix line of Markers is the pinnacle of performance and the XX Anniversary Dm14 is resetting that standard.

 

The longest running franchise in pro paintball, the L.A. Ironmen, sets their own high standards on the field and depends on the highest level equipment to take their game to the next level.  The Ironmen XX DM14 fulfills that need. “The Ironmen DM14 is the Ferrari of paintball guns. I couldn’t ask for a better shooting, better looking, or easier to maintain paintball gun. It has everything we need to bring home another championship title.” ~Marcello Margott

 

 

 

 

Wolf and Aztek take on Fight for Asylum 3!

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

This past weekend I headed to the Fight for Asylum 3 game at the World Famous PRZ Field in Ontario Canada.  This massive facility is an abandoned hospital with several buildings and outdoor battle area, and challenges even the most experienced players! This annual even brought 700 of the most intense paint ballers from all over North America and did not disappoint!  The Generals were Don Walsh of Team ODST and Josh “Orange” Saumure of Citrus Connection, both experienced leaders sent their fighters into some of the most fun they’ll ever have!  I had to crawl through windows, fight it out in stair wells, and clear room by room to find cell phones and flash drives to accomplish missions, its was such a blast I felt sorry for those who could not make it, The DYE Booth was a place to meet and greet players, and along with DYE Player Patrick AZTEK Boulanger, we had a great day of Action.  The game takes place over 2 days including a night game. Come back to http://www.dyetactical.com for updates on future games, and join me next time for the Most Intense Close Quarters Battle you can endure!   Visit PRZ PAINTBALL for field information, and go to thewolfsden on YouTube for the Action video soon!

 

SoCal Ghosts take Mt. Suribachi!

Friday, April 11th, 2014

In February, 1945, the United States landed on the small island of Iwo Jima. The island was part of the Japanese home islands and the Japanese forces that were defending it were prepared to protect it to the last man. Dominating the pork chop shaped island was Mount Suribachi located at the small southern tip of the relatively flat island. The Japanese were heavily dug in on Suribachi and had dug tunnels throughout the mountain.  The Americans assaulting Suribachi would take heavy casualties but eventually the Marines would raise the American flag at its summit on February 23rd, an event which was captured by combat photographer Joe Rosenthal and would come to symbolize America’s war effort.

On September 23, 2013 at Velocity Paintball Park in San Diego, Southern California paintball players came out to play on the 69th anniversary of that famous event.  This was to be no re-enactment though, this time the Americans could be thrown off the hill and the flag might never go up. The weather for the event was perfect with clear skies and temperatures in the 70s. While there would be a Japanese side and an American side, the teams would be further divided. The Americans were split between the U.S. Infantry, who started on the West side of the field, and the U.S. Marine Corps who would start on the East side of the field. The Japanese were split into the standard Japanese Infantry who started in the North side of mid field below the mountain and the Imperial Japanese Infantry who started on the south side of the mid field on top of the hill.

Each faction received an armband which had their faction’s flag on it.  The U.S. Infantry would have the American flag, the Marines their Marine Corps Flag, the regular Japanese Infantry would have the red “meatball” flag and the Imperial Japanese infantry would have the Rising Sun Japanese Battle Flag. The Generals for each faction carried a 3’ x 5’ flag on a large pole and had to have these flags on them while they were on the field. Each faction would be allowed to respawn in the same location as where they started which would lead to some interesting incidents.

The Tactical Ironmen from Dye and the SoCal Ghosts found themselves on the same team but on opposite ends of the field. The SoCal Ghosts also brought out their two PUG Tanks and assigned one to each side. In addition the Juggernaut, a player in special armor who carried two markers tied together surrounded by three rocket launchers, also roamed the field. The tanks could be taken out by two grenade or LAW rocket hits within a minute of each other while the Juggernaut could be taken out by one grenade, one LAW or a paintball hit to a very small section of his lower back, the only place on his person that was without armor.

At the sound of the horn the teams took off for their objectives. There were props on the field like maps, radio codes, and radio boxes to collect. The Marine’s had to get the Marine Corps hymn and sing it for a referee. The Japanese though, in running down the hill, thinned out their defenses on the top of the hill.  As the overall objective was to capture the hill, this gave the U.S. teams a golden opportunity. They pressed the hill hard and quickly overran the scattered Japanese defenders capturing the top of the hill before the window opened to allow the tanks and Juggernaut onto the field.

The game was reset and restarted with the Japanese now staying a bit closer to the hill.  The Japanese infantry at the bottom of the hill found themselves quickly in a dangerous position. On one side, the American Infantry was pressing hard and already captured their General’s flag. The American General could be seen on the field with the American Flag in one hand and the Japanese “meatball” flag in the other.  On the other side of the Japanese Infantry were the American Marines.  The Marines were also quickly surging into the Japanese position.  Before long, the last Japanese player was eliminated from the field.  However, the Marines and U.S. Infantry didn’t realize that the players they were seeing facing them were on the same team.  For a brief moment, American Infantry and U.S. Marines were trading paint but after a few moments the mistake was realized and both units turned to the South and began assaulting Mt. Suribachi.

The Japanese seemed to be ill equipped to deal with the American armor allowing it to cause a considerable amount of damage while the U.S. forces caused the Japanese tank scooting and dodging barrage after barrage of American rockets. The second game took much longer but again, the American forces carried the day and raised the flag again on top of the hill.

After a quick break for lunch both sides traded places. The American infantry now started at the bottom of the hill in the middle of the field and the Marines started on the top of the hill. All props were once again in play and at the sound of the horn the U.S. forces pressed hard with help of their tank. The Japanese infantry general lead a Banzai charge against the U.S. tank and quickly fell, leaving his flag behind right on the props in that area. The American tank called for his infantry to come forward but by that time the woods behind him were full of Japanese infantry laying thick suppressive fire keeping the American infantry in their bunkers just yards from their props. While the flag was retrieved the props remained.

On top of the hill the Marine’s held their ground and used the dominating terrain to keep the Japanese attackers at bay.  Meanwhile, the American Infantry below recovered from the Japanese assault and, after capturing the Imperial Japanese infantry flag as well, kept Japanese forces from putting together a coordinated assault against the Marines. As time ran out, the Americans retained the hill.

The day ended with a more traditional game of capture the flag with those players that were still around. Overall it was a great day of paintball and once again the American flag flew high and proud over a pile of rocks in San Diego California.

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