Posts Tagged team

Marcello Margott Wins CCP Event #3 in Colombia

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

CCP #3 – Medellin, Colombia

 by Marcello Margott

Photos by: 100% Paintball

One of the most enthusiastic paintball communities I have been to. My trip to Colombia was nothing short of amazing. It started out with an over night flight to Miami where I had a nice 6 hour layover, those are always fun. I took a nap in the Lounge and tried to hold in my excitement of getting to South / Central America for paintball for the first time. I didn’t know what to expect, what sort of venue they would have, the talent level, how friendly the people were, this was all a new experience for me and I couldn’t wait to see what was in store. After my long wait I finally got on the plane, here we go, next stop, COLOMBIA!

I landed Wednesday night around 8pm and got picked up by our friend Tito who plays for one of the DYE teams down there. He took us back to our massive house, I was amazed when we pulled up. This place was a Colombian mansion villa style that I fell in love with. We had juke boxes, pool tables, outdoor verandas with fountains and everything. This was the real deal. It had been a long travel day so I set my things down and decided to take a shower. I was in for a rude awakening when I was told that we didn’t have any hot water! So, I say whatever,  when in Rome right? Or Colombia.. So I turn the water on and hop in. This must have been the coldest shower I had ever taken in my life. It felt like jumping into one of my ice baths that I prepare for my knee. Nonetheless it felt good to get clean and go eat some authentic Colombian food.

We spent a few days traveling the city and seeing Medellin. I must say, it was pretty cool being able to walk freely in a city that was once ruled by Pablo Escobar. What they had to overcome is astonishing and I feel blessed to have had such a safe trip to this beautiful country. The team took us all around the main spots of downtown Medellin and let us fulfill our wanderlust for the night, but work would start early the next morning.

Friday I woke up, excited to meet everyone at the clinic. I always love to see what type of players show up because there is so much talent across the world. I always go to a clinic hoping to find at least 1 kid that really has what it takes to become a pro. This clinic was filled with them. Everyone was dedicated to learning our program and using the techniques we gave them to improve.

We must have had about 20 participants and 100 spectators. It was crazy how involved everyone down there was and it was an honor to have people so interested in what I do. We wrapped up the day with some autographs and giveaways and everyone was more than thankful. I had an awesome time after we were done just hanging around the field with the players. Everyone there was really friendly and made us feel at home. Now that the clinic was over, it was time to win a tournament.

We went back to the house for a mellow night because we wanted to be fresh for the event. The league ran fairly smooth, although they could absolutely use some improvement with organization I thought everything went pretty well. The CCP seems to be a growing league down in South America and I’m excited to see how far they’ve come. We got through our two days of play and were in the finals, only dropping 1 point the entire tournament. Sure enough the team that beat us that 1 point would be the team we faced in the finals, where they scored another point but still lost 1-4 against us.

We won the tournament and suddenly the stands had completely emptied. Every single person inside the stadium was lined up to take pictures and have me sign autographs. It was truly an overwhelming feeling and it made me really think about how thankful I am to be in a situation where I can have such a positive influence on people because of paintball. I take my responsibility very serious and Colombia was an event that reminded me of everything this sport has given me. Traveling the world and doing what I love, cant beat that. Cant wait to get back down there and see how much it continues to grow in South America. Gracias amigos!

-Marcello #33

For more information on the CCP, be sure to check them out on Facebook HERE

Team BOLT Competes in Pro-Shar Cup (SFD) – FINAL

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Pro-Shar Cup (SFD) – FINAL in Rostov-on-Don

by TEAM BOLT

Teams in the tournament:

D1:

B.O.L.T. – Krasnodar (888)

LendLord – Rostov-on-Don (763)

Rusich – Volgodonsk (759)

ZLO – Rostov-on-Don (728)

Skif – Taganrog (645)

Molotov – Rostov-on-Don (576)

Absinthe – Krasnodar (529)

Humstars – Astrahan (457)

Our Team:

1. Boris Kukhlev # 23.

2. Alexander Kovalenko # 77.

3. Roman Kovalenko # 8.

4. Anton Kirman # 10.

5. Anton Sokolov # 90.

6. Alexey Bayunov # 96.

7. Victor Kosko # 3.

Match day. 8am. Our team of fearsome warriors managed to come together using every means of transportation imaginable. Incredibly, everybody was on time but we were not without casualties: two of our finest players were unable to make it. Nor were we all fit for duty, a few having woken up at 4am and driven all the way from Krasnodar for the event. Our spirits were once again lowered when we saw our first match was to be none other than Rusich, our main rival and a team with a tough reputation.

With this lingering negativity we hastily gathered our equipment and began the first game. We began by losing the first two rounds but managed to pull ourselves together and claw back to a 2-2 draw, showing the progress in experience the team has made over the last year. In the fifth and final round the disruption of our formation began to show and we ended the game with a close 2-3 loss.

Seething with frustration we decided to change our formation with a focus on the lower flank for the next game against Skif. This tactic proved fruitful and we pulled off an easy 4-2 win.

We further perfected the tactic in the final game of the group stages and beat Absinthe 4-0.

In the semi-final we were put up against the unbeaten team ZLO, a strong team using experienced mercenairies. We lost the first two games but once again managed to pull back to a 2-2 draw and using the momentum, and by changing our focus on shooting straight from the banner we secured our entry into the final!

Final: B.O.L.T vs Rusich

Having lost the fist game against this team we were all the more determined to take first place in the tournament. Our opponent was certain to have a trick up its sleeve and it was clear they had changed their tactics and once again we were 2-0 down. We decided to use our strategy of shooting early form the banner, one that proved successful against ZLO. Clawing our way back and using more than our fair share of ammunition we managed to secure a 2-2 draw when the time ran out. In overtime we were dead tired having played the entire tournament with only 5 players! In the final game we were left after 30 seconds with only 1 player against their 4. A twist of fate proved the Gods were favouring us that day. One of the opponent players placed a hand on his head as a sign of being out of the game, and suddenly shot our final player in point-blank range. After much discussion the referees gave us a technical victory: we were Pro-Shar champions!

Official Apology from Team TonTons for PSP West Coast Open

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

8/22/13

Fabrice “Tavarez” Colombo

Press Release: TonTon Apology

Firstly, I would like to apologize on behalf of the entire “Tonton” team for the events that took place at the PSP West Coast Open, and I need to express that it has all been blown completely out of proportions.

The TonTon team has existed for more than 21 years, and we have been playing at the highest level for most of this time. This year we have decided to put all our efforts into playing the most challenging and difficult paintball league in the world, the PSP.

For us, playing the PSP means a lot of sacrifice, and this has only been possible with thanks to our sponsors, especially DYE, for whom we have the greatest respect.

The fact we are a team from Europe, the efforts we have to put in on a personal and financial level in order to play the PSP are enormous. We have had to put our jobs and family lives on hold to enable us to compete at this level, and for us to live our passion.

Considering our “Pro” status, that some people may consider our team “Privileged”, and even with the help from our sponsors, we still cannot meet the financial demands to play, but we do manage to compete.

For example, we must fit within our budget to travel a week before every event to work on the layout. This means that with the five PSP events, we spend one and a half months of the year in the USA. Plus bringing into account the cost of hotels, transport and food etc etc, our costs do mount high.

We also have players from 2 different countries, and that even the players themselves who do live in France live far away from each other too.

Therefore, we have a reduced roster in order to fit this within our budget, and be able to play a entire season of PSP.

Secondly, on a personal level I have played for 2 years with the Philly Americans, and I know all too well how many sacrifices have to be made in order to play at a professional level, and in order to be able to play with and against the best.

After our “descent” into the Challengers divisions at the last PSP event, we really wanted to fight our way back into the Pro division and play the PSP World Cup 2013 in the Pro division. So we doubled our efforts in order to make this happen.

But not to the point where we would do anything ‘illegal’ to make this happen. We are not that stupid, to sacrifice all that I have mentioned above by cheating.

Our philosophy is and has always been to train harder, in order to be the best, NEVER to cheat.

I know, by experience, that whatever the nationality, there have always been suspicions towards Pro teams. And even more when an American team comes to play in Europe, or when an European team comes to play in the United States.

History has taught us that. Just look back, what were then just ‘rumors’, when Dynasty was dominating the Millennium, or when Joy Division was playing the NPPL….. In the end, the reality of these rumors was the level of skill of these teams on the field, and the fans that support their favorite teams that made the “myths”.

This sometimes leads to passionate debates, and exaggerated comments on any “incident ” about a team. This is part of the game, part of the sport, part of any sport. And in this way, it is also part of paintball.

As a Pro paintball team, we know this can happen in good and in bad “incidents”. And on this note, what pro player or pro team, has never been in this kind of situation?

The more you are exposed, the more you become vulnerable to these kind of outbursts.

That’s just the way it is.

So I digress, moving back to the basis of this letter, during our game against Aftershock, at the start of the 4th point, we had 4 guns that were shooting hot over the chrono. There is no doubt about it.

These are the FACTS and what really happened, and can be verified is on paintballaccess.

The first marker to be checked was Loic Voulot’s gun, he was chrono’d between 300 and 310 FPS. He received a minor penalty.

The second marker belonged to Axel Gaudin, whose gun chrono’d below 300 FPS.

The third marker belonged to Frank Chambon, and he was chrono’d at 317 FPS and he received a major penalty.

The fourth gun belongs to Karl Samuelson and was chrono’d at 304 FPS(he received a major in the confusion).

As for me, my gun was chrono’d at 307 FPS, and i received a minor penalty.

Loic Voulot’s marker was then re-checked and HIS FIRST SHOT ONLY was chrono’d at 323 FPS and later his gun was re-checked again at 352 Fps.

This was due to a Drop-Off (an o-ring was torn in his regulator) all the shots fired with Loic’s marker after the first shot were below 300 FPS.

We verified our markers pre-game with the pit chrono, and this chrono gave us a totally different read on ALL of our markers.(Below 300 FPS as the rules stipulate).  Our mistake was to not verify this with a second chrono.

Because any player with a little bit of tournament experience knows that you can get different reads of a chrono, depending on the angle you shoot upon it.

This does NOT excuse the fact that we were shooting “hot”. It is 100% our own fault, because we did not double-check our markers.

Especially for the marker that shot 352 FPS ON THE FIRST SHOT ONLY, even though all the other shots with this marker were below 300 FPS, there is no excuse.

We weren’t paying enough attention, or maybe we were too “involved ” in the game. This is un-excusable at our level.

When I read on the internet that we use cheater modes in our markers, that we have “suspicious ” habits of shooting into the grass before games, and that we shoot entire lines of “missiles”, I say: NO.

The PSP and the referees, brought in a Dye Technician during the gun check, who took apart all markers that were shooting hot. They concluded that:

All our DM13 were stock (boards, parts, settings).

The DM that was chrono’d at 352 FPS ON THE FIRST SHOT, had a regulator problem, one o-ring used.

None of our DM13 guns were modified to have an increase in velocity during the game.

None of our DM13 guns had a “cheater” Mode.

We would like to thank Lane from the PSP for his press release on this.

Other players, including pros, have been caught with a marker that shoots over 300 FPS. Some have even been caught shooting A LOT HIGHER than our markers, and probably had the same problems that we had.

Even our opponents: Aftershock had 2 markers that were shooting over 300 FPS during our game. Our mistake is to have 4 markers that shot over 300 FPS at the same time, and 1 of those markers shooting very hot on the first shot. It is an unfortunate error on our part, and we have been penalized with minors and majors during the game for this.

But we do not want to serve as scapegoats because we are Europeans in an American competition.

We did NOT ‘cheat’ intentionally, and we do not use cheater modes in our markers to get our victories. We have sacrificed and invested too much, both privately and professionally, and we respect our sponsors (we thank them for their support) too much, to throw it all away in such a stupid and unconsidered way. We have made a human mistake and have lacked responsibility. Nothing more. There is no plot to gain an unjustified advantage. We would like to give our apologies to the spectators, our fans, the players, and to the referees. The referees have a difficult and thankless job, really much more difficult than ours, and we respect them for it.

We are Pro paintball players. Paintball is our passion.

-Tavarez, Captain of TonTon

 

Sydney Explicit: Sitting in 1st Place in the Australian Super 7 Series

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

photos by: Painted Lion Productions & Super 7 Series

Team Name: Sydney Explicit

League: Australian Super 7s series

Rank: Currently tied for 1st place with one round to go

 

At the beginning of the 2013 season we strengthened our roster with 3 new players:

Nathan McDonnell from the retired Hostile Intentions; and John Robba and Mick Jones formerly of Sydney XFighters.

 

Our roster now consists of:

-Chris “Crispy” Bell (Captain);

-Nathan “Macca” McDonnell;

-John Robba;

-Mick “Plucka” Jones;

-Matthew Friedrich;

-Troy Friedrich; and

-Jake “The Snake” Spencer

February 2013 marked Round 1 and our first outing together as a newly refreshed team – we finished 2nd to Sydney SWAT.

In Round 2, May 2013, while Sydney SWAT did get the better of us, we secured a strong 2nd place.

While these results were positive, they weren’t exactly what we were after. Our desire was, and what seemed to us to be, that elusive 1st place. So, after some team meetings we decided to up our training sessions and intensity.

Come Round 3 and we all believe we are ready. At the end of Saturday’s prelims we were sitting in first place. The team is super pumped about this, but we all know paintball is a 2 day event. We still had a lot of work to do to make sure we would win the event.

Sunday came along and we started off strong. We faced XFighters and secured a 4-0 win.

Our next match was against our Round 1 and 2 favourite, Sydney SWAT. We would soon see if all our preparations had paid off. The match did not start off the way we wanted – SWAT was able to get away with a 3 point head start. However, we dug in deep and started to claw our way back with time running out on the last point. Our efforts gave us a 3-2 loss. We were a little disappointed (as you would be) but we still knew we had the goods to win.

We made it to the finals and were facing off against the NZ Clown Monkeys. We had beaten them in the prelims so, yes, our confidence was super high. And rightly so… we achieved a 4-0 win, however it was a tough match and both teams should be proud of their achievements and the way they played.

Outside of playing tournaments we’ve also been helping out with some of our local amateur players. We’re helping them with their skills at trainings and also teaching them and their teams to read field layouts at tournaments with great success. It is very rewarding having the up and comers looking to you for guidance.

Super 7s Masters (Round 4) is in November and we cannot wait! We believe we can win it and the series. We would like to thank everyone for their support throughout the year and hope to see you out there.

-Sydney Explicit

 

Play Like a Pro Video Series – Episode 2 “Tuck and Shoot”

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Marcello Margott of the Los Angeles Ironmen teaches us how to get sneaky G’s with the “Tuck and Shoot” technique on this episode of Dye’s Play Like a Pro Series.

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