Posts Tagged winner

Dynamix back on the podium!

Monday, April 14th, 2014

The boys from South Africa are back on the podium! After a dominating season in 2013, winning both the SARPL series and World Cup Asia, the team showed that they’re not slowing down and are as focused as ever. Proving so by winning the annual Sweetspot event hosted by

Blades and Triggers. Craig Marley from Dynamix gave us a rundown of how the event went for them:

Sweetspot 2014 was hosted at the Blades and Triggers paintball range in Boksburg.  It ran both 3 man and 5 man formats with two divisions for each, open and elite.  Dynamix entered in the elite division in both formats despite normally sticking to the 5-man format.

The 3 man was a lot of fun, the guys just got to go out and enjoy a day of “not so” serious paintball.  At the end of the day the two DNX teams entered placed 1st and 3rd. The 3-man was well run and we enjoyed the opportunity to play on Blades and Triggers turf field.

Sunday brought about the 5 man elite and the turnout didn’t disappoint, with 7 teams showing up to play.  The field layout was a tricky one to gauge but despite dropping two games in the prelim rounds, coming into the knockout rounds the team had warmed up to the challenge.  In the finals we came up against fellow BNT team Apocalypse (who also hadn’t dropped a game throughout the day). DNX managed to win the final 1-0, leaving Blades and Triggers with 3 teams on the podium.

A huge thanks to Blades and Triggers for the great prizes that they sponsored and the fantastic event they hosted. Thank you to Dye for the great gear we have the privilege of wearing. DM14 for the win!

SoCal Ghosts take Mt. Suribachi!

Friday, April 11th, 2014

In February, 1945, the United States landed on the small island of Iwo Jima. The island was part of the Japanese home islands and the Japanese forces that were defending it were prepared to protect it to the last man. Dominating the pork chop shaped island was Mount Suribachi located at the small southern tip of the relatively flat island. The Japanese were heavily dug in on Suribachi and had dug tunnels throughout the mountain.  The Americans assaulting Suribachi would take heavy casualties but eventually the Marines would raise the American flag at its summit on February 23rd, an event which was captured by combat photographer Joe Rosenthal and would come to symbolize America’s war effort.

On September 23, 2013 at Velocity Paintball Park in San Diego, Southern California paintball players came out to play on the 69th anniversary of that famous event.  This was to be no re-enactment though, this time the Americans could be thrown off the hill and the flag might never go up. The weather for the event was perfect with clear skies and temperatures in the 70s. While there would be a Japanese side and an American side, the teams would be further divided. The Americans were split between the U.S. Infantry, who started on the West side of the field, and the U.S. Marine Corps who would start on the East side of the field. The Japanese were split into the standard Japanese Infantry who started in the North side of mid field below the mountain and the Imperial Japanese Infantry who started on the south side of the mid field on top of the hill.

Each faction received an armband which had their faction’s flag on it.  The U.S. Infantry would have the American flag, the Marines their Marine Corps Flag, the regular Japanese Infantry would have the red “meatball” flag and the Imperial Japanese infantry would have the Rising Sun Japanese Battle Flag. The Generals for each faction carried a 3’ x 5’ flag on a large pole and had to have these flags on them while they were on the field. Each faction would be allowed to respawn in the same location as where they started which would lead to some interesting incidents.

The Tactical Ironmen from Dye and the SoCal Ghosts found themselves on the same team but on opposite ends of the field. The SoCal Ghosts also brought out their two PUG Tanks and assigned one to each side. In addition the Juggernaut, a player in special armor who carried two markers tied together surrounded by three rocket launchers, also roamed the field. The tanks could be taken out by two grenade or LAW rocket hits within a minute of each other while the Juggernaut could be taken out by one grenade, one LAW or a paintball hit to a very small section of his lower back, the only place on his person that was without armor.

At the sound of the horn the teams took off for their objectives. There were props on the field like maps, radio codes, and radio boxes to collect. The Marine’s had to get the Marine Corps hymn and sing it for a referee. The Japanese though, in running down the hill, thinned out their defenses on the top of the hill.  As the overall objective was to capture the hill, this gave the U.S. teams a golden opportunity. They pressed the hill hard and quickly overran the scattered Japanese defenders capturing the top of the hill before the window opened to allow the tanks and Juggernaut onto the field.

The game was reset and restarted with the Japanese now staying a bit closer to the hill.  The Japanese infantry at the bottom of the hill found themselves quickly in a dangerous position. On one side, the American Infantry was pressing hard and already captured their General’s flag. The American General could be seen on the field with the American Flag in one hand and the Japanese “meatball” flag in the other.  On the other side of the Japanese Infantry were the American Marines.  The Marines were also quickly surging into the Japanese position.  Before long, the last Japanese player was eliminated from the field.  However, the Marines and U.S. Infantry didn’t realize that the players they were seeing facing them were on the same team.  For a brief moment, American Infantry and U.S. Marines were trading paint but after a few moments the mistake was realized and both units turned to the South and began assaulting Mt. Suribachi.

The Japanese seemed to be ill equipped to deal with the American armor allowing it to cause a considerable amount of damage while the U.S. forces caused the Japanese tank scooting and dodging barrage after barrage of American rockets. The second game took much longer but again, the American forces carried the day and raised the flag again on top of the hill.

After a quick break for lunch both sides traded places. The American infantry now started at the bottom of the hill in the middle of the field and the Marines started on the top of the hill. All props were once again in play and at the sound of the horn the U.S. forces pressed hard with help of their tank. The Japanese infantry general lead a Banzai charge against the U.S. tank and quickly fell, leaving his flag behind right on the props in that area. The American tank called for his infantry to come forward but by that time the woods behind him were full of Japanese infantry laying thick suppressive fire keeping the American infantry in their bunkers just yards from their props. While the flag was retrieved the props remained.

On top of the hill the Marine’s held their ground and used the dominating terrain to keep the Japanese attackers at bay.  Meanwhile, the American Infantry below recovered from the Japanese assault and, after capturing the Imperial Japanese infantry flag as well, kept Japanese forces from putting together a coordinated assault against the Marines. As time ran out, the Americans retained the hill.

The day ended with a more traditional game of capture the flag with those players that were still around. Overall it was a great day of paintball and once again the American flag flew high and proud over a pile of rocks in San Diego California.

WAIAKILL – DYE TACTICAL TAKES OVER UWL ECUADOR

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

It’s endless summer here in Ecuador and our paintball season never ends. WAIAKILL – DyeTactical began 2014 training hard and focused on local and international UWL (Ultimate Woodsball League) tournaments, among other events we will attend this year.
We started getting our new 2014 gear in as soon as possible to adjust rapidly to the change. Less weight, smaller size, improved accuracy and air efficiency on our new DM14′s, allowed us to maximize performance and carry more paint in our vests (as UWL has no limit on the amount of paintballs you can bring into the field). Additionally, the macro line was removed from the new DM design, which meant less tangling up with branches and bushes, just as the DAM, which we were already used to since its release last year.
The tournament took place in “Cerro del Muerto” in the town of Playas, Ecuador on the 15 and 16 of February. Besides the tough opponents and intense games, the biggest challenges of this amazing field were the extreme weather conditions. Temperature ranging between 90 to 95F (32-34C), lots of mud, intense sun and humidity to the roof, made it difficult enough just to be there with no gear on. Thanks to the support of our DYE distributor, Luis Neira, we got ahold of enough Dye  Pop-up Tents to manage the weather and stay fresh and focused for the games. DYE tech support on site was another of the keys to success.

WAIAKILL – DyeTactical went in the tournament with 3 teams (15 players   on each team, 10 on court and 5 replacements).
Each team had 4 games played randomly among all competitors. The two most successful teams went to finals.
WAIAKILL ALPHA won all its games and got a solid 4 – 0 to go into finals. Meanwhile WAIAKILL BRAVO met ALPHA on its third game and got its first loss. In the final match WAIAKILL ALPHA met again with Team Dragones, who barely made it into second place in an extremely close match (4 point difference) with  BRAVO, who was favorite to play finals but got in third place.
The final game was not an easy one, mostly because of the exhaustion and tension. Scouts from the two opossing teams went for different  flags on the initial run, making it a tie in the first minutes of the match. WAIAKILL ALPHA’S aggressiveness got ahold of the lost flag before the first 10-minute brake and retained it through the entire game. The hooch was found during the second break, adding up more points to the overal score. With both flags and the hooch in our hands, our game was mathematically unreachable. We knew we could go all in for their home flag after the second break and pushed hard to try to end the game early. Dragones defended well and prevented us to advance to their home base flag. After 30 minutes of intense physical effort the game was over and we had won UWL Ecuador first chapter. WAIAKILL BRAVO came in third place, getting WAIAKILL – DyeTactical two places in the podium.
We are now training hard for the second chapter that will take place in Quito, Ecuador, May 3-4. We will try to keep on adding points on UWL’s local and international ranking.
We’ll keep you posted on the advances of UWL and other events.
For pics and vids of this and other tournaments and events follow us @waiakill in Instagram, Tweeter, Facebook and YouTube.
Come meet and share with us at the DYE Store in Living Legends 7, May 16-18.
Keep on balling!!

Derrick Moncayo McGuiness
UWL Tag #30

STK brings the heat to the Super7 in Sydney!

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

We went to Sydney on the east coast of Australia a few weeks ago to compete in the first leg of Australia’s national series, the Super 7′s. The last time we played in this league was 2009. It was great to come back to it. The infrastructure and refereeing was excellent. We really enjoyed the event.

We won all of our prelim games except against SWAT, who we drew.

Our weekend started with us going down two points to Explicit, but Farran ran through and got 4 G’s in the third point and we were able to run away with it from there. We had a couple of other close calls in the prelims, but thankfully we were able to close those games out. Our weekend grew to a climax with our second last match of the prelims against nVs. The winner of this game would go onto the finals.

Our game against them felt good; we’d worked out all the kinks from the prelims and we were working as a machine. We had a good fight against them and won 3-2.

Our final preliminary game was against SWAT – but we’d both already made it through to the finals, so we used the opportunity to feel them out. They had our friend “Oat” (ex-Infernal/Xtioneers) playing for them and Kyle Spica of San Diego Dynasty. We made sure our break-shooting was on point and injected as much chaos as we could into our game plans to try not give anything away for our finals match. We timed the match out at 2-2. We went onto the finals for a rematch.

The finals started well for us, with us making our break-shots and followed shortly with us closing the first point out. The next point, we both lost bodies on the break, and the game whittled down to a 2 vs 3, with just Travis and Farran left in either corner. They stayed cool and burnt off about 8 minutes from the game clock before being edged out by SWAT. So the score was 1-1 with 1:30 left on the clock. The next point we were able to make our initial kill on the dorito-side off the break and then caught some subsequent players filling out to that side. With about 30 seconds left, it was just Kyle Spica left in a 5 vs 1. He still managed to catch two of us, but we were able to eliminate him and Stevie sealed the deal, hitting the buzzer with 8 seconds left on the clock.

Winning felt great, and the environment at the Super 7’s was accommodating, professional and… premium. It also had a huge prize pool. I’d recommend playing these events to any of our PALS friends.

Maybe a little bit before the event, people were saying things like “show them who is the best in Australia.” Playing paintball, there has been no shortage of people I’ve come across who have these self-proclaimed titles or that have over-inflated egos. Success in paintball is so fickle. And I often find these self-proclaimed heroes are just frustrated with the game because they are always trying to justify themselves or live up to something rather than just enjoy the experiences. And really who cares? If you think you’re good then just keep it to yourself. Your performance can speak for itself. I guess where I am going with this is that I’m not interested in asserting titles.  All I can say is that going full circle and being back at the Super 7′s after keeping the team together for this long — it feels good to say that it hasn’t all been for nothing.

We’ve had a few months with our DM14’s now and we love them even more. Thanks to Devon and DYE for their continued support going into the 4th year of our sponsorship with them. And to our paintball mum and dad, Brad and Christine.

Team Aisawan sets the pace for the 2014 season!

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Speed Aisawan

During the past weekend, 8 – 9 February 2014, we were involved in one of Thailand’s biggest paintball events “Thailand Paintball Official Circuit”, the first event of the year.

Day 1 started off early in the morning with high hopes and enthusiasm. We played against 3 opponents but the results didn’t go as planned. The first round continued into Day 2 where we were back on track by winning both games in the morning and were able to go through to the semi final round ranked 4th overall. Our opponent for the semi final round was Virgin Aisawan who we lost to in Day 1. However we stuck to our game plan and beat them 2-0, which brings us to the final round of TPOC event meeting with team Hornet from Chonburi. With a little tradition, for TPOC’s final game; names were announced, gears ready and game on. The score ended with 2-0, game over, champion by team Speed Aisawan.

To sum up, the event has brought us great joy and experience. 2014 await and we’ll never stop practicing until our goals are accomplish.

We would like to thank the event organizers and all supporters. A big thank you to Mr. Acha Aisawan, and DYE

- Tanachate Sirima (team Speed Aisawan)

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